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Stem Cell Scientists Make Case For More Research To Defeat Diseases

Over the last few years more scientists are learning what Christian Drapeau and STEMTech have known for years….that adult stem cells make up our bodies renewal system and we can naturally increase their numbers by taking Stem Enhance. Increase your circulating stem cells for optimal health.

Leading stem cell scientists make an impassioned case for renewing humanity and defeating disease.

Blood Stem-Cell Transplant Regimen Reverses Sickle Cell Disease in Adults

Blood Stem-Cell Transplant Regimen Reverses Sickle Cell Disease in Adults

 A modified blood adult stem-cell transplant regimen has effectively reversed sickle cell disease in 9 of 10 adults who had been severely affected by the disease, according to results of a National Institutes of Health study in the Dec. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The trial was conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., by NIH researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

“This trial represents a major milestone in developing a therapy aimed at curing sickle cell disease,” said NIDDK Director Griffin P. Rodgers M.D., a co-author of the paper. “Our modified transplant regimen changes the equation for treating adult patients with severe disease in a safer, more effective way.”

Sickle cell disease is caused by an altered gene that produces abnormal hemoglobin, the protein in normal red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. When affected red cells lose oxygen, they collapse into a sickle, or C, shape and become stiff and sticky. Clumps of these cells block blood flow and can cause severe pain, organ damage from lack of oxygen, and stroke. Anemia often develops in people with the disease because sickle cells die off quickly and bone marrow does not make new ones fast enough.

In trials by other investigators, nearly 200 children with severe sickle cell disease were cured with bone marrow transplants after undergoing a regimen in which their own marrow was completely destroyed with chemotherapy. That regimen, however, had proven too toxic for adults, who have years of accumulated organ damage from the disease and are less able to tolerate complete marrow transplantation.

In contrast to the established method in children, this adult trial sought to reduce toxicity by only partially replacing the bone marrow. The much longer lifespan of normal red blood cells, compared to sickle red blood cells, allows the healthy cells to outlast and completely replace the disease-causing cells.

To achieve this goal, the investigators used a low dose of radiation to the whole body and two drugs, alemtuzumab and sirolimus, to suppress the immune system. Alemtuzumab depletes immune cells, but does not adversely affect blood stem cells. Sirolimus does not block the activation of immune cells, but inhibits their proliferation, creating a balance that potentially helps prevent rejection of the new stem cells.

The radiation favorably conditions the bone marrow, where donor stem cells move in and begin producing new, healthy red blood cells. After a median two and one half years follow-up, all 10 recipients were alive and sickle cell disease was eliminated in nine.

“Our patients have had a remarkable change in their lives,” said John F. Tisdale, M.D., the trial’s principal investigator in the NIH Molecular and Clinical Hematology Branch. “They are no longer being admitted to the hospital for frequent pain crises, they have been able to stop chronic pain medications, go back to school and work, get married and have children. Given these results, our regimen will likely have broad application to other nonmalignant diseases and can be performed at most transplant centers.”

 Transplanted cells or tissue are known as grafts. To reduce the possibility of the immune system’s rejection of the graft or development of graft-versus-host disease, in which immune cells from the donor attack the recipient’s tissues, investigators tested the patient and the potential donor to determine if they are a good immunological match. This is called human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing.

The investigators performed HLA typing on 112 people with severe sickle cell disease and 169 healthy siblings. Of these, 10 patient-sibling identical matches were found. Blood stem cells collected from the blood of healthy donors were then infused into their siblings, ages 16 to 45 years.

This relatively low toxicity regimen allowed patients to become tolerant to the donor immune cells and to achieve stable mixed donor chimerism. Chimerism is a condition in which an individual has two genetically distinct types of cells in the blood. This mixture of host and donor cells was sufficient to reverse sickle cell disease. In most patients the donor’s red blood cells completely replaced the recipient’s.

“Remarkably, the treatment did not result in graft-versus-host disease for any of the participants,” noted Susan B. Shurin, M.D., acting director of the NHLBI. GVHD is a common complication of stem cell transplantation and can lead to serious problems, such as rash, diarrhea and nausea, liver disease, or death. “We are continuing to explore better treatments with fewer side effects to help the millions of sickle cell patients worldwide. This is a very important study because it lessens the toxicity of a therapy known to be highly effective.”

 In the United States, approximately 80,000 people have sickle cell disease, found mainly in people of African ancestry. It occurs to a lesser extent in people of Hispanic, Middle Eastern, Asian and white ancestry. Worldwide, millions of people have sickle cell disease. The pain and complications associated with sickle cell disease can have a profound impact on patients’ quality of life, ability to work, and long-term health and well-being.

One of the main obstacles in treating a larger number of African-Americans with sickle cell disease is the relative lack of an available HLA-matched donor. Dr. Tisdale explained, “Most white Americans can easily find a matched donor in the unrelated bone marrow or cord blood registries; yet when we screened a number of the people in our trial who were without an HLA-matched sibling donor, we could not find a compatible unrelated donor.”

However, there may be a way beyond this health care disparity, Tisdale indicated. If participants in the current trial continue to do well with their transplants it may be possible to move to what he calls “haplo-transplantation,” or a half-match from a sibling, parent or child. “This would allow most people with sickle cell disease to be treated and enjoy a better quality of life,” he said.

 The NIH Clinical Center’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Transfusion Medicine provided clinical laboratory and transfusion medicine support and patient care for the stem cell donors and transplantation recipients in trial. The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Medical Institute provided conceptual input into the design of the trial’s immunological component. The trial is registered as NCT00061568 in www.clinicaltrials.gov.

Health care providers — and sickle cell patients and family members who may be interested in joining NIH blood stem-cell transplant studies — may call 301-402-6466 for more information. Calls will be returned within 48 hours. To search for other clinical trials, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) conducts and supports research — at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide — to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

 The NIH Clinical Center (CC) is the clinical research hospital for the National Institutes of Health. Through clinical research, physician-investigators translate laboratory discoveries into better treatments, therapies and interventions to improve the nation’s health. For more information, visit http://clinicalcenter.nih.gov.

Part of the National Institutes of Health, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) plans, conducts, and supports research related to the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, and blood diseases; and sleep disorders. The Institute also administers national health education campaigns on women and heart disease, healthy weight for children, and other topics. NHLBI press releases and other materials are available online at: www.nhlbi.nih.gov.

 NIDDK, part of NIH, conducts and supports basic and clinical research and research training on some of the most common, severe and disabling conditions affecting Americans. The Institute’s research interests include: diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity; and kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases. For more information, visit www.niddk.nih.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation’s Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

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More information on sickle cell disease is available at: www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Sca/SCA_WhatIs.html  and http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/hemovari-A1C/.

For information on blood stem cell transplantation and HLA matching, visit http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/labs/aboutlabs/lhd/geneticImmunotherapySection/malech.htm

Posted at National Institute of Health

http://www.nih.gov/news/health/dec2009/niddk-09.htm

Christian Drapeau MSc The Amazing Stem Cell Discovery Lecture

STEMTech HealthSciences presents …

The Amazing Adult Stem Cell Discovery!

As Neurophysicist & World Renowned Author, Christian Drapeau MSc., Chief Science Officer of STEMTech Health Sciences, shows you how to benefit from the Most Important Health Discovery to come along in Decades!!

 

  • The World’s First Adult Stem Cell Enhancer!
  • Triggers an Increase Of 25% More Circulating Adult Stem Cells!
  • Double Blind Placebo Study Now Published In Major Medical Journals!

Bryan Noar, Director, Sales & Marketing, STEMTech HealthSciences, Inc. Since leaving his past life as a Certified Public Accountant, Bryan has spent two decades – both in the field and as a corporate executive – helping thousands of people to achieve better lifestyles in the health, financial and self-development arenas.

  • Unlock your body’s hidden potential for self-renewal
  • Find out how others have achieved dramatic levels of health and vitality
  • Unleash your body’s full potential for peak fitness & performance
  • Seize exciting opportunities created by the Stem Cell Nutrition explosion!

Wednesday – March 10, 2010

7:00 pm to 9:30 pm

Arlington Hilton

2401 East Lamar Blvd Arlington, TX 817-640-3322

Attendance is FREE so bring your family, friends and lots of guests.

Seating is limited so R.S.V.P. to:   

 Jacki Smith 817-510-3600   www.askjackismith.com

New Ways To Treat Kidney Damage Using Adult Stem Cells

Scientists have discovered that it may be possible to repair a patient’s kidney using cells taken from their own body. They have shown for the first time that cells in bone marrow are capable of turning into kidney cells.

The breakthrough could lead to new ways to treat kidney damage caused by cancer and other diseases.

It could also mean that doctors may eventually be able to restore function to patients suffering from kidney failure, and may pave the way to new gene therapy for kidney diseases.

The work has been carried out by scientists at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Barts Hospital, the London Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine.

Early development
They focused on cells from the bone marrow at the very earliest stage of their development.

Kidney facts:
An estimated 100,000 people in the UK suffer from some form of kidney disease, excluding cystitis and kidney stones.
There are approximately 32,000 kidney patients receiving treatment in the UK.
50% of these have had a kidney transplant and are considered to be actively having treatment because they still require regular anti-rejection medication.
During 1999, 1,742 kidney transplant operations were performed in the UK and Ireland.
However, 5,056 people were actively waiting for a suitable organ for transplant.
Currently about 25% of grafts fail after five years.
At this stage this stem cells have the potential to develop into white blood cells, red blood cells or another type of blood structure called a platelet.
Scientists have already shown that these cells can transform themselves into liver cells.

The new work shows that they can turn into kidney cells too.

Professor Nick Wright, head of Imperial Cancer Research Fund’s Histopathology Unit, said: “This discovery is very exciting and means we have new ways to treat kidney damage caused by cancer or other diseases.

“Doctors could use stem cells from the patient’s own bone marrow to replenish kidney cells lost by injury.

“This would be of huge benefit as the kidney is very poor at repairing itself.

“Furthermore, there would be much less complication with the kidneys rejecting the new cells, because they would come from the patient’s own body.

“Another exciting development would be using bone marrow stem cells containing genes resistant to cancer or other disease, to protect the kidneys from further damage.”

Transplant

Research pathologists in Imperial Cancer’s Histopathology Unit analysed female kidneys transplanted into male patients.

Using a special DNA probe that identifies male cells they checked the patient’s new kidneys.

They found male kidney cells in the donated female kidneys, meaning that the recipient’s male bone marrow cells had transformed into kidney tissue.

Professor Wright said: “Anti-rejection medication after a kidney transplant costs about £5,000 per patient a year, and each year the number of new patients needing kidney transplants increases by about 5%.

“It would be fantastic to save kidney patients this trauma and save the NHS some money.”

Dr Poulsom, a research pathologist at Imperial Cancer, said: “The potential for advances in medicine from using adult stem cells is enormous.

“They can give rise to many different types of cells so any organ may one day be repaired. Using adult stem cells also avoids the ethical dilemmas associated with embryonic stem cell work.”

The National Kidney Research Fund said the research opened up exciting possibilities.

But in a statement, it said: “However, in spite of today’s announcement, the Fund believes that we are probably many years away from preventing kidney failure.

“This is because the intricate structure of the kidney compared to the simple liver tissue makes it much more difficult to replace the many functions of the two million kidney filters and tubules and also in kidney failure scarring distorts the tubules so that there is nowhere for new cells to function making it difficult for the kidney to repair itself.”

The research is published in the Journal of Pathology.

Stem cell breakthrough may offer possible cures for Diabetes, Parkinson’s disease

Posted in Adult Stem Cell Research,Adult Stem Cells by Jacki Smith on March 14, 2009
Tags: , , , , , , ,

London, March 2 (ANI): Scientists have reached a step closer to developing potential treatments for devastating diseases including spinal cord injury, macular degeneration, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease, thanks to a new method of creating stem cells discovered by researchers at Mount Sinai Hospital in Canada.

The researchers say that their study accelerates stem cell technology, and provides a road map for new clinical approaches to regenerative medicine.

“We hope that these stem cells will form the basis for treatment for many diseases and conditions that are currently considered incurable,” Nature magazine quoted Dr. Andras Nagy, Senior Investigator at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Investigator at the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine, and Canada Research Chair in Stem Cells and Regeneration, as saying.

“This new method of generating stem cells does not require embryos as starting points and could be used to generate cells from many adult tissues such as a patient’s own skin cells,” the researcher added.

Dr. Nagy revealed that his method helps create pluripotent stem cells-which can develop into most other cell types-without disrupting healthy genes. The researcher added that the method involves a novel wrapping procedure to deliver specific genes to reprogram cells into stem cells.

Scientists have to date relied upon approaches that requite the use of viruses to deliver the required genes, a method that carries the risk of damaging the DNA.

Given that Dr. Nagy’s method does not require viruses, it overcomes a major hurdle for the future of safe, personalized stem cell therapies in humans.

“This research is a huge step forward on the path to new stem cell-based therapies and indicates that researchers at the Lunenfeld are at the leading edge of regenerative medicine,” said Dr. Jim Woodgett, Director of Research for the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital.

Regenerative medicine refers to enabling the human body to repair, replace, restore and regenerate its own damaged or diseased cells, tissues and organs. (ANI)

Patients First Act Adult Stem Cells HR 2807 & HR 877

Richard Burt M.D. has completed a study using adult stem cell therapy on patients that has been published in JAMA – The Journal of the American Medical Association. Three of his patients from the study that had received injections of their own adult stem cells, taken from their bone marrow, spoke in front of lawmakers in Washington DC. They are trying to get funding for the same adult stem cell therapy that has helped them. Dr. David Prentice PhD. of the Family Research Council thanked the bi-partisan group that sponsored the bill H.R. 2807 The Patient First Act that would seek funding for the therapies that wil help the patients first. The public should call lawmakers and have support them support the bill.

How can we approve Embryonic Stem Cell legislation? Especially when there is no proof of any true merit and comes with life threatening side effects… then hold out on funding for adult stem cell therapy which has scientific studies proving its effectiveness. The legislation that was introduced above H.R. 2807 was introduced but never made it out of committee.  See below.

H.R. 2807:  Patients First Act of 2007
  Introduced Jun 21, 2007
  Reported by Committee (did not occur)
  Voted on in House (did not occur)
  Voted on in Senate (did not occur)
  Signed by President (did not occur)
This bill never became law. This bill was proposed in a previous session of Congress. Sessions of Congress last two years, and at the end of each session all proposed bills and resolutions that haven’t passed are cleared from the books. Members often reintroduce bills that did not come up for debate under a new number in the next session.

So it was reintroduced on Feb. 4, 2009 as H.R. 877:  Patients First Act of 2009. It was submitted to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce which has 59 members. Here is a link to all the members and all the bills that they are overseeing http://twurl.nl/0mrnuo .

Please join with me and write your representatives and tell them we want H.R. 877  passed. We should have the opportunity to intensify stem cell research which has already been showing evidence of substantial clinical benefit to patients, and for other purposes, and in an ethical manner.  The latest info on the bill is below and I will continue to update it.

H.R. 877:  Patients First Act of 2009

  Introduced Feb 4, 2009
  Referred to Committee View Committee Assignments
  Reported by Committee (pending)
  Voted on in House (pending)
  Voted on in Senate (pending)
  Signed by President (pending)

This bill is in the first step in the legislative process. Introduced bills and resolutions first go to committees that deliberate, investigate, and revise them before they go to general debate. The majority of bills and resolutions never make it out of committee. [Last Updated: Mar 7, 2009 11:31AM]

For more information on stem cell enhancers which aid our bodies in releasing our own adult bone marrow stem cells feel free to visit my website www.stemcellhotline.com. Leave me a comment to let me know what you think of the politics involved with this subject.

CARDIOVASCULAR REVASCULARIZATION MEDICINE

CARDIOVASCULAR REVASCULARIZATION MEDICINE

SCIENTIFIC STUDIES – 
st-cardio-journalCARDIOVASCULAR REVASCULARIZATION MEDICINE
including Molecular Interventions
Posted January 1, 2008

Abstract – PubMed.gov

Description

Mobilization of human CD34+CD133+ and CD34+CD133%u2212 stem cells in vivo by consumption of an extract from Aphanizomenon flos-aquae-related to modulation of CXCR4 expression by an L-selectin ligand?

This article is not included in your organization’s subscription. However, you may be able to access this article under your organization’s agreement with Elsevier.
Gitte S. Jensen, Aaron N. Hartb, Lue A.M. Zaske, Christian Drapeau, Niraj Guptad, David J. Schaeffere and J. Alex Cruickshank

a. Holger NIS, 601 13 Avenue NE, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2E 1C7

b. NIS Labs, 1437 Esplanade, Klamath Falls, OR, USA

c. StemTech Health Sciences Inc., 1011 Calle Amanecer, San Clemente, CA, USA

d. Cancer Treatment Center, Merle West Medical Center, 2610 Uhrmann Rd, Klamath Falls, OR, USA

e. Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

The coauthor C. Drapeau is Chief Science Officer for StemTech Health Sciences, which distributes the product StemEnhance, used for the in vivo part of this paper. No other authors have any commercial interest in the subject matter. Available online 29 August 2007.

Abstract
Objective
The goal of this study was to evaluate effects on human stem cells in vitro and in vivo of an extract from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) enriched for a novel ligand for human CD62L (L-selectin).

Experimental approach
Ligands for CD62L provide a mechanism for stem cell mobilization in conjunction with down-regulation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor for stromal derived factor 1. Affinity immunoprecipitation was used to identify a novel ligand for CD62L from a water extract from AFA. The effects of AFA water extract on CD62L binding and CXCR4 expression was tested in vitro using human bone marrow CD34+ cells and the two progenitor cell lines, KG1a and K562. A double-blind randomized crossover study involving 12 healthy subjects evaluated the effects of consumption on stem cell mobilization in vivo.

Results
An AFA extract rich in the CD62L ligand reduced the fucoidan-mediated externalization of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor on bone marrow CD34+ cells by 30% and the CD62L+ CD34+ cell line KG1A by 50% but did not alter the CXCR4 expression levels on the CD34 cell line K562. A transient, 18% increase in numbers of circulating CD34+ stem cells maximized 1 hour after consumption (P<.0003). When 3 noncompliant volunteers were removed from analysis, the increase in CD34+ cells was 25% (P<.0001).

Conclusion
AFA water extract contains a novel ligand for CD62L. It modulates CXCR4 expression on CD34+ bone marrow cells in vitro and triggers the mobilization of CD34+ CD133+ and CD34+ CD133 cells in vivo.

Keywords: L-selectin; Ligand; Human; Adult stem cell; CD34; CD133; KG1a; K562; Bone marrow; Mobilization; Blue-green algae; Cyanobacteria; Aphanizomenon; In vivo; In vitro

Abbreviations: AFA, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; PBMC, Peripheral blood mononuclear cells; PMN, Polymorph-nucleated cells

Article Outline
1. Introduction
2. Materials and methods
2.1. Buffers and media
2.2. Cyanobacterial extracts
2.3. Monoclonal antibodies
2.4. Capturing of ligand using Dynabeads and chimera proteins
2.5. Electrophoresis
2.6. Human subjects
2.7. Immunostaining for L-selectin
2.8. Immunostaining for CXCR4 expression on different types of progenitor cells
2.9. Induction of CXCR4 expression on various types of stem and progenitor-type cells
2.10. Study design for in vivo testing of consumption of an LSL-rich fraction of AFA
2.11. Statistical analysis
3. Results
3.1. AFA contains a ligand for human L-selectin (CD62L)
3.2. AFA-W specifically reduces TQ1 immunostaining of L-selectin on human PMN cells
3.3. AFA-W inhibits the fucoidan-induced CXCR4 expression on CD34+ cells from bone marrow and on the KG1a CD34bright cell line but not on the CD34%u2212 cell line K562
3.4. In vivo: consumption of an AFA extract rich in AFA-LSL resulted in a transient increase of circulating CD34+ cells
4. Discussion

Acknowledgements
References

Download Complete Article Here: http://twurl.nl/2ne65h